LGBTQ inclusion – Tips for Elementary Teachers

We’re here today to talk about LGBTQ inclusion in your classroom and what you can do. Now there are a couple of simple tips – I think this is a topic where people get really overwhelmed – they’re really concerned about doing it the right way. We get into education because we are passionate about helping the next generation succeed, about creating global citizens and educating our young people so the best way that we can create great people, excellent leaders, and good human beings moving forward is to give them the space that they need to be their authentic selves starting at a young age. so I’m going to give you a couple of tips right now of how you can start to create more inclusive spaces in your classrooms.

Now these are tips that you can do individually without institutional support. Tip number one: learn the facts. On average more than 50 percent of teachers surveyed reported that they were uncomfortable intervening when a student was bullied about their real or perceived sexual orientation and/or gender identity and expression. According to recent survey 95.8% of LGBTQ students heard anti-gay remarks like faggot or dyke at school. Ninety-five point seven percent of young people heard negative remarks about gender expression and eighty five point seven percent heard negative remarks specifically about transgender people. Eighty five point two percent of LGBTQ students reported that they were verbally harassed, 27 percent reported that they were physically harassed, and 13 percent reported being physically assaulted at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation. And nearly 58 percent of LGBTQ young people reported feeling unsafe in school because of their sexual orientation. These statistics are alarming and it shows that LGBTQ people do not feel safe in school. This alone should be motivation for us to take action. Number two: learn the language. Without having the language or the terminology, we can’t begin to have these conversations inclusion and respect.

So the next step for you as an educator is to become more aware of what the current terminology is regarding sexual orientation and gender identity and expression. Our young people are constantly coming up with words that feel authentic to describe their identity and so that language may be very different than the language that you and I learned growing up. So it’s our responsibility as educators as we grow away from that school age to educate ourselves on the terminology that’s current and being used right now. The next step is to train and educate people around you.

If you are part of an organization of teachers or of educators and you have some influence, if you have a professional development group or school in-service days, advocate for LGBTQ inclusion training for your fellow teachers. The next step is to disrupt anti-LGBTQ behavior or comments as soon as you see them. So if we hear or witness anti-LGBTQ remarks or behavior and we do nothing to intervene that sends a very clear message that we think that’s acceptable and for any LGBTQ young person. It’s important that we step in and shut that behavior down immediately. It’s important to send a message to the entire classroom that using anti-LGBTQ remarks making jokes or teasing or bullying young people based on their real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity is unacceptable in your classroom. The next step is to integrate LGBTQ topics into your curriculum.

Don’t wait for National Coming Out Day or Day of Silence to talk about LGBTQ issues; integrate it into the rest of the chapters just as you would with any other piece of history. There are gay scientists and lesbian mathematicians and queer people across the world who are doing amazing things it’s important to send the message that LGBTQ people are as a part of the fabric of our nation as any other person. The way that we do this is by providing this visibility throughout the entire academic year and not just designating LGBTQ topics to one or two special days or special events or a theme week in your school.

Another good tip is to set policy or to advocate for policy to be set. Now policy change is hard – I get it. I know by working in in higher education for 11 years that to actually get a policy set or to see change on paper can be really challenging but with your advocating for that in your position as an educator, it will send a message to your boss, your other administrators, to your school district and other stakeholders that this is important for the education of our young people. Another great tip is to be public about your support for your LGBTQ students and for students to be allies. Now there are a lot of different ways that you can do that but visual signs of support will help a student know that your classroom or you are safe space. It could be something as simple as posting a sticker of a rainbow flag in your classroom or by wearing a rainbow pin, by talking about and recognizing LGBTQ people and events of significance when they happen.

It’s going to make a huge difference for those students who are looking for that. It’s also going to create an environment and a culture of inclusion and respect amongst your students and hopefully in your school. This is just the tip of the iceberg. These are just a few things that you can do to create more inclusive spaces in your classroom and for your students so I encourage you to continue to create safer and more inclusive spaces for all of the young people in your classrooms. If you have questions please leave them below or feel free to contact me on social media – @TheChrisMosier.

I’ll be happy to give you more resources, book recommendations, survey information, help you write policies, anything I can do to create these safer spaces for our young people to show up and feel supported and that they can really just be themselves. Thanks for listening. Catch you next time. .

6 Satisfying Moments Queer Women Understand

– Next week, on the 400. – I love you. – I love you, too. – Yes! Maggie, Lily didn’t die this week. (upbeat music) – You know, you look very nice today. – Thank you. Are you flirting with me? – Yeah, yes, yes I am, thank you. – You know the new girl, Cara? – Yeah. – Do you know what, like, her deal is? – Well I heard that she broke up with her girlfriend like a couple weeks ago, but… – So one could argue that she’s like, queer? – Yeah, I mean I think so.

– This guy needs to stop. – So could I get your number? – Actually I’m a lesbian. – And here come the gross comments. – That’s chill, talk to you later. – So do you have a boyfriend? – Um… – Or a girlfriend? Or a partner? – No, I’m telling you, Kristen Stewart’s gay. – No, she’s dating Robert Pattinson. Their love is eternal. Kristen Steward and girlfriend Soko hold hands. – Told ya. (upbeat music) – And their love is eternal. – Totally wishin’ she had pussy. (laughing) .

9 Questions Gay People Have For Straight People

– Why is my sexuality “a lifestyle”? – Why do you call it a lifestyle? – Like choosing to wear a dress? – He lives by the beach, that’s his lifestyle. – It’s not really a lifestyle. It’s just my life. Why is that when you find out that I’m gay, you think that I want you? – Standards, first of all. – Everyone has a type. You might not be their type. – Don’t flatter yourself. – Why are you so worried about how I’m going to have kids? – Why does it matter if I’m going to have kids or not? – Technically, the world is overpopulated and me not reproducing is helping you out. – So if I want to have kids, I’m pretty sure I can figure it out. – Why do you feel the need to ask who’s the man and who’s the woman in the relationship? – Last I checked, we were both women.

– That’s why we’re together. Both have lady parts. – Why do you get offended if people ask if you’re gay? – Why would you be offended that someone thinks you’re gay? – I don’t get offended when people think I’m straight. – I mean, I kinda do. – There are worse things. How does it feel to be accurately represented in everything? – Every single show and film ever. – Why is your definition of diversity a gay white man? – I can’t think of anyone who reminds me of me. – The most that I had was Buffy. And she was straight. – Sailor Moon would probably be the closest representation of a young gay Asian. – Why is it that you have such a large dating pool? – But still a really high divorce rate? – Because it’s real marriage because it’s heterosexual. – Why do you have to call it a gay wedding? – It’s just a wedding. – It’s just a wedding. – Is it just so you can charge us more? – If two black people were getting married, would you call it a black wedding? Why do you try to set us up with the very next gay person you see? – I don’t try to set you up with the other straight guy I know.

– We have Tinder or Grinder. What do gay ladies use? Oh, we don’t have one. Okay, never mind. Thank you for trying to set us up. We need help. – You have to take into account the percentage of women that are interested in women and then those precentage of women who I’m attracted to and then those percentage of women who are attracted to me and then those percentage of women that you know, I have chemistry with and that our personalities line up.

And that’s like three women. Maybe. .